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Chesterfield Literary Terms

Terms

undefined, object
copy deck
repetition of similar vowel sounds followed by different consonant sounds
assonance
the patterns of rhymes in a poem
rhyme scheme
technique in which the reader uses his or her own judgement to decide what a character is like based on evidence the writer gives the reader
indirect characterization
a story that can be interpreted on various levels; a story that conveys a moral message; each character or event symbolizes something else
allegory
short dramatic work performed by one; long uninterrupted speech delivered by one person
monologue
a repeated word, phrase, line, or group of lines
refrain
vantage point of a story; who is telling the story
point of view
extreme exaggeration
hyperbole
an all-knowing third person point of view
omniscient point of view
musical quality produced by the repetition of stressed and unstressed syllables or other sound patterns
rhythm
an account of a person's life written or told by another person
biography
a contrast or discrepancy between expectation and reality
irony
a song that tells a story
ballad
a play on the multiple meanings of a word; two words that sound alike but have different meanings
pun
a comparison between two unlike things without using like or as
metaphor
language that appeals to the five senses
imagery
writer says one thing but means another
verbal irony
an informal record or communication; a brief written reminder
memo
a long fictional story
novel
long narrative poem that relates great deeds of a larger-than-life hero who embodies the values of his or her society
epic
when conflict in a story is solved
resolution
makes reference to a statement, person, place, event, or thing know in literature, history, religion, myth, politics, sports, science, or pop culture
allusion
any literature that is not poetry
prose
a story that is true
nonfiction
inanimate objects take on human characteristics
personification
the use of corresponding sytactical forms
parallelism
when the audience or the reader knows something important that the characters do not know
dramatic irony
regular pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables
meter
a word whose sound imitates or suggests its meaning
onomatopoeia
contrast between what would seem appropriate and what really happens
situational irony
an account of a writer's own life
autobiography
a metrical foot or unit of measure consisting of an unstressed sylloable followed by a stressed syllable
iambic
making someone else think like you think
persuasion
repetition of initial consonant sounds in two or more neighboring words or syllables
alliteration
rhythmic compressed language that uses figures of speech and imagery designed to appeal to our emotions and imaginations
poetry
the series of related events that make up a story
plot
writing that ridicules a person, group of people, humanity, social institution, etc. in order to reveal a weakness
satire
when and where a work takes place
setting

Deck Info

38

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