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GRE General Set 9

Terms

undefined, object
copy deck
career
rush wildly; go at full speed [from Latin carrus, a Gallic type of wagon.]
arsenal
storage place for military equipment
overturn
turn over; capsize; topple
glossary
brief explanation of words used in the text
virulent
(of a disease or poison) extremely harmful or poisonous; (of a feeling) hostile; bitter; N. virulence; CF. virus; CF. venom [Middle English, from Latin vīrulentus, from vīrus, poison.]
devious
roundabout; erratic; deviating from the straight course; not straightforward; not completely honest; Ex. ~ route
obituary
death notice (esp. in a newspaper); ADJ.
husbandry
frugality; thrift; economy; agriculture; farming; Ex. animal husbandry; CF. husbandman; The act or practice of cultivating crops and breeding and raising livestock; agriculture.; # The application of scientific principles to agriculture, especially to animal breeding.; Careful management or conservation of resources; economy.; [Middle English husbondri, from huseband, husband. See husband.]
disport
amuse; Ex. ~ oneself; CF. divert [Middle English disporten, from Old French desporter, to divert : des-, apart; see dis- + porter, to carry (from Latin portāre; see port5).]
centrifugal
radiating; departing from the center [From New Latin centrifugus : Latin centrum, center; see center + Latin fugere, to flee.]
compelling
overpowering; irresistible in effect; holding one's attention; that compels one to do something; Ex. a compelling adventure story; V. compel
acquittal
deliverance from a charge; V. acquit: free from a charge or accusation; discharge from a duty; conduct (oneself) in a specified manner
leave-taking
farewell or departure
ingrate
ungrateful person (not expressing thanks)
pacifist
one opposed to force; antimilitarist; ADJ. N. pacifism: opposition to war as a means of resolving disputes
quixotic
idealistic but impractical; CF. Don Quixote [From English Quixote, a visionary, after Don Quixote, hero of a romance by Miguel de Cervantes.]
egotism
tendency to speak or write of oneself excessively; conceit; self-importance
comport
bear one's self; behave; Ex. ~ oneself; N. -ment; To conduct or behave (oneself) in a particular manner: ~ yourself with dignity.; [from Latin comportāre, to bring together : com-, com- + portāre, to carry.]
perverse
purposely continuing to do something wrong; stubbornly wrongheaded; perverted; directed away from what is right; wicked and unacceptable; Ex. ~ satisfaction; Ex. Hannibal Lecter in a ~ mood; N. -sity [Middle English pervers, from Old French, from Latin perversus, past participle of pervertere, to pervert. See pervert.]
dorsal
relating to the back of an animal; Ex. dorsal fin
absolve
pardon (an offense); To pronounce clear of guilt or blame.; To relieve of a requirement or obligation.; a. To grant a remission of sin to.; b. To pardon or remit (a sin).
titter
nervous giggle; nervous laugh; V.
jurisprudence
science of law
evocative
tending to call up (emotions, memories)
solvent
able to pay all depths; N. -cy [[French, from Latin solvēns, solvent-, present participle of solvere, to loosen. See solve.]
bohemian
unconventional (in an artistic way); A person with artistic or literary interests who disregards conventional standards of behavior.;
conscientious
scrupulous; through and careful; Ex. conscientious worker
sordid
filthy; foul; base; vile; Ex. ~ bed/story [from Latin sordidus, dirty, from sordēre, to be dirty.]
mimicry
imitation
furor
frenzy; great anger and excitement; CF. fury
truism
self-evident truth
posterity
descendants; future generations; Ex. go down to ~; CF. posterior, anterior [Middle English posterite, from Old French, from Latin posteritās, from posterus, coming after. See posterior.]
helm
steering wheel of a ship; position of control
recreant
disloyal; cowardly; N: disloyal and cowardly person; [Latin re-, re- + Latin crēdere, to believe.]
capacious
spacious
junta
group of persons joined in political intrigue; cabal; group of military officers ruling a country after seizing power (by force) [from feminine past participle of Latin iungere, to join.]
foreboding
premonition of evil; feeling of coming evil; V. forebode: be a warning of (something unpleasant)
nexus
connection; A means of connection; a link or tie: "this ~ between New York's . . . real-estate investors and its . . . politicians" (Wall Street Journal).; A connected series or group.; # The core or center: "The real nexus of the money culture [was] Wall Street" (Bill Barol).; [Latin, from past participle of nectere, to bind.]
exhilarating
invigorating and refreshing; cheering; V. -te: make cheerful and excited; Ex. -ted by the ride in the sports car
shrew
scolding woman; very small mouselike animal
distraught
upset; distracted by anxiety; very anxious and troubled almost to the point of madness; Ex. ~ with grief/worry [Middle English, alteration of distract, past participle of distracten, to distract. See distract.]
incident
event; event that causes a crisis
skeptic
sceptic; doubter; person who suspends judgment until he has examined the evidence supporting a point of view; ADJ. -cal; N. -cism; scepticism
incendiary
arsonist; ADJ: causing fire; of arson; Ex. ~ bomb; [from Latin incendiārius, from incendium, fire, from incendere, to set on fire. See incense1.]
succulent
juicy; full of juice or sap; full of richness; N: ~ plant such as a cactus [Latin succulentus, from succus, juice.]
allegory
story, play, or picture in which characters are used as symbols; fable [from Greek, from allēgorein, to interpret allegorically : allos, other + agoreuein, to speak publicly (from agora, marketplace).]
high-flown
highly pretentious or inflated
tender
offer formally; extend; Ex. ~ one's resignation/the exact fare; N: formal offer; money; Ex. legal tender; ADJ: young and vulnerable; sensitive to the touch; sore; soft; delicate; Ex. child of ~ years; Ex. ~ wound
copious
plentiful;Yielding or containing plenty; affording ample supply: a ~harvest. See synonyms at plentiful.; Large in quantity; abundant: ~rainfall.; Abounding in matter, thoughts, or words; wordy: "I found our speech copious without order, and energetic without rules" (Samuel Johnson). [Middle English, from Latin cōpiōsus, from cōpia, abundance.]
fagged
too tired, exhausted
putrefy
make or become putrid; N. -faction; [from Latin putrefacere : puter, putr-, rotten + facere, to make.]
hideous
repulsive to the sight; ugly; repugnant; Ex. ~ face/scream
lectern
reading desk or stand for a public speaker
oratorio
dramatic poem set to music; long musical work with singing but without acting; CF. cantata
choreography
art of representing dances in written symbols; arrangement of dances; [French chorégraphie : Greek khoreia, choral dance; see chorea + -graphie, writing (from Latin -graphia, -graphy).]
bluster
blow in heavy gusts; threaten emptily; bully; speak in a noisy or bullying manner; CF. breeze, gust, gale
dialectical
relating to the art of debate; mutual or reciprocal; Ex. dialectical situation; N. dialectic: art of arriving at the truth by the exchange of logical arguments [Middle English dialetik, from Old French dialetique, from Latin dialectica, logic, from Greek dialektikē (tekhnē), (art) of debate, feminine of dialektikos, from dialektos, speech, conversation. See dialect.]
gape
open widely; open the mouth wide; stare wonderingly with the mouth open; CF. agape
nauseous
causing nausea; feeling nausea
materialism
preoccupation with physical comforts and things; excessive regard for worldly concerns (rather than spiritual matters)
ransack
search thoroughly; pillage (going through a place); Ex. Enemy soldiers ~the town. [Middle English ransaken, from Old Norse rannsaka : rann, house + *saka, to search, seek.]
compost
mixture of decaying organic matter used as fertilizer; V: put or make ~ [from Latin compositum, mixture, from neuter past participle of compōnere, to put together. See component.]
insatiable
not easily satisfied; unquenchable; Ex. ~ appetite
imperturbable
unshakably calm; placid
arch-
chief; first; Ex. archbishop
retain
keep; maintain possession of; employ (esp. a lawyer or advisor); N. -ner: servant; fee paid to ~ an advisor
glut
overstock; fill beyond capacity (with food); fill to excess; N: oversupply [Middle English glotten, probably from Old French glotoiier, to eat greedily, from Latin gluttīre.]
supersede
replace; cause to be set aside; make obsolete; N. supersession
dossier
file of documents on a subject or person; file; A collection of papers giving detailed information about a particular person or subject. CF. bundle of papers labeled on the back [French, from Old French, bundle of papers labeled on the back, from dos, back, from Latin dorsum.]
eleemosynary
charitable [[Medieval Latin eleēmosynārius, from Late Latin eleēmosyna, alms. See alms.]
coroner
public official who investigates any death thought to be of other than natural causes
jagged
notched, rough
sloth
slow moving tree-dwelling mammal; laziness; ADJ. -ful: lazy; indolent
perspicuity
clearness of expression; freedom from ambiguity; The quality of being perspicuous; clearness and lucidity: "He was at pains to insist on the ~ of what he wrote" (Lionel Trilling).
aria
operatic solo; a song sung by one person in an opera or oratorio [Italian, from Latin āera, accusative of āēr, air, from Greek āēr.]
alms
money or goods given to the poor [from Late Latin eleēmosyna, from Greek eleēmosunē, pity, charity, from eleēmōn, pitiful, from eleos, pity.]
transparent
permitting light to pass through freely; easily detected; obvious; clear; Ex. ~ lie
officiant
One who performs a religious rite or presides over a religious service or ceremony.
ignoble
unworthy; not noble; dishonorable; Ex. ~ deed
brunt
main impact or shock (of an attack or blow); Ex. ~ of the argument
simian
monkeylike; N: ape or monkey; [From Latin sīmia, ape, probably from sīmus, snub-nosed, from Greek sīmos.]
aleck
one who considers himself smarter than others
protean
able to take on many forms; versatile; [CF. Proteus: sea god to change his shape at will]
impasse
predicament(dangerous condition) from which there is no escape; situation allowing for no further progress [French : in-, not (from Latin in-; see in-1) + passe, a passing (from Old French, from passer, to pass; see pass).]
chaste
morally pure; virginal; abstaining from illicit sexual acts; modest; simple (of a style of writing); not highly decorated; austere
pied
of various colors; Patchy in color; splotched or piebald.
valor
bravery; ADJ. valiant: possessing ~; brave [Middle English valour, from Old French, from Late Latin valor, from Latin valēre, to be strong.]
fawning
courting favor by cringing and flattering; V. fawn: exhibit affection as a dog; seek favor or attention by obsequiousness
didactic
Intended to instruct.;Morally instructive.; Inclined to teach or moralize excessively. [Greek didaktikos, skillful in teaching, from didaktos, taught, from didaskein, didak-, to teach, educate.]
inestimable
impossible to estimate; (apprec) invaluable; of immeasurable worth
ale
fermented alcoholic beverage similar to but heavier than beer
miscellany
mixture of writings on various subjects; collection of various items; A collection of various items, parts, or ingredients, especially one composed of diverse literary works.[Latin miscellānea, miscellanea. See miscellanea.]
proxy
authorized agent; authority to act for another
reprobation
severe disapproval; CF. approbation; A comment expressing fault: blame, censure, condemnation, criticism, denunciation, reprehension.
extrinsic
external; not essential or inherent; extraneous; OP. intrinsic
abate
subside or moderate; To reduce in amount, degree, or intensity; lessen. See synonyms at decrease.; # To deduct from an amount; subtract.; law a. To put an end to.; b. To make void.; (from Latin ad-; see ad-) + batre, to beat; see batter1.]
inter
bury; N. -ment [Latin in-, in; see in-2 + Latin terra, earth.]
annul
make void
analgesic
causing insensitivity to pain; N.

Deck Info

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