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POETIC TERMINOLOGY

Terms

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Archetype
An original model or type after which other similar things are patterned.
Metaphor
A direct comparison of two unlike objects by identification or substitution; a comparison that is suggested or implied.
Theme
The fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work.
Apostrophe
An address to a person or personified object not present in the work
Style
A convention, with respect to word usage, metre, rhyme scheme, form, etc in writing.
Onomatopoeia
The use of a word whose sound suggests its meaning; imitative harmony.
Figures of Speech
Those devices which appeal more to the mind than the ear.
Free Verse
A form of poetry that is written with no consistency in line leght, meter, rhyme, or stanza form; is very rythmic, often patterned after the spoken word.
Paradox
A statement which appears self-contradictory, but underlines a basis of truth.
Alliteration
The repetition of sounds in nearby words usually the first letters
Personification
To give human or personal qualitities to inanimate things or ideas.
Understatement
The deliberate expression of a suject with less emotions or description than the sujbject calls for, often used for ironic effect, and also called MEIOSIS
Ballad
A narrative poem, usually simple and fairly short, originally designed to be sung.
Imagery
A device that creates a picture in the imagination of the reader; a mental reproduction or literary imitation of a sensory experience meant to evoke the same experience in a reader or the audience.
Antithesis
Sharply opposing ideas are expressed within a balanced grammatical structure
Consonance
The repetition of two or more consonant sounds WITHIN a line close toghther .
Allusion
A direct reference to a proper noun; the reference is usually mythological but could be legendary, religious, historical, or literary; the invocation of a name recalls concurrently ideas, emotions, traditions, insights, moral and ethical stances
Oxymoron
When two words, of opposite meaning are used together to create an effect.
Connotation
The set of associations implied by a word in addition to its literal meaning. These associations can be either positive or negative.
Allegory
An extended narrative which carries a second meaning along with its surface story; people and/or events are symbolic
Satire
A literary work holding up human voices and follies to ridicule or scorn.
Fixed Form
A form of poetry that is written in fixed metrical patterns and rhyme schemes.
Metonymy
The substitution of a word which relates to the object or person to be named, in place of the name itself.
Simile
A direct comparison of two unlike objects, using LIKE, or AS.
Lyric
A subjective, reflective poem expressing the thoughts and especially the feelings of a single speaker; has a regular rhyme scheme.
Ambiguous
The intentional or accidental suggestion of more than one meaning
Hyperbole
A gross exaggeration for effect: overstatement
Tone
An author's attitude towards his subject matter or subjects of his writing.
Denotation
the explicit or direct meaning or set of meanings of a word or expression.
Symbol
An object used to suggest another hidden object or idea.
Litotes
A deliberate understatement; makes an assertion about something by denying its opposite.
Cliché
A trite, stereotyped expression; a sentence or phrase, usually expressing a popular or common thought or idea, that has lost originality, ingenuity, and impact by long overuse.
Narrative Poem
A poem that records events, sometimes brief, somtimes long, which is highly objective, told by a speaker detached from the action.
Parody
A humorous or satirical imitation of a serious piece of literature or writing.
Sonnet
A verse form containing fourteen lines, in English, usually in iambic pentametere, and a complicated rhyme scheme. Two types: Shakespearean and Italian or sometimes called Petrarchan.
Irony
The contrast between actual meaning and the suggestion of another meaning. This can be VERBAL--meaning one thing but saying another; DRAMATIC--a contrast between what the speaker says and what the author means or what the reader knows to be true; SITUATIONAL--when the reality of a situation differs from the anticipated or intended effect--when something unexpected happens.
Mood
the feeling or atmosphere of a piece of writing. A poem's mood can embody all the human emotions.
Conceit
An extended metaphor, a comparison that is often elaborate, extended, or startling, between objects which are apparently dissimilar.
Assonance
The repetition of two or more vowel sounds WITHIN a line
Synecdoche
A part of something is used to represent the whole object or idea.

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