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Glossary of Tone Vocabulary Words

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earthy
realistic, rustic coarse, unrefined, instinctive, animalize
effeminate
soft, delicate, unmanly
elegiac
of, relating to, or involving mourning or expressing sorrow for that which is irrecooverably past
emotional
much given to strong feelings
epistolary
involving letters
erudite
learned, scholarly
eulogistic
involving formal praise in speech or writing, usually in honor of someone dead
evocative
having the ability to call forth memories or other responces
ex:// Mayberry by Rascall Flatts
expressionistic
stressing the subjective and symbolic is art and literature
facetious
amusing, but light, unserious, frivolous
farcical
humorous but in a light way, comedy with high exaggeration
fatalistic
believing that everything that happens is destined and therefore out of the hands of the individual
flamboyant
conspicuously bold or colorful
fluid
flowing smoothly
iconoclastic
inclined to attach cherished beliefs nad traditions
ie: green day lyrics
impressionistic
inclined to use subjective impressions rather that objective reality
ironic
poignantly contrary to what was expected or intended
irreverent
showing disrespect for things that are usually respected or revered
journalistic
characterized by the kind of language used in journalism
lyrical
intense, spontaneous, musical
metaphorical
having the characteristics of melodrama in which emotions are plot are exaggerated and characterization is shallow
mournful
feeling or expressing grief (certain literary forms are devoted to the expression of grief, such as elegies)
mundane
ordinary or common, as in everyday matters ("His mind was filled with mundane matters")
naturalistic
tending to present things in art and literature as they appear in nature or actuality
nostalgic
inclined to long for or dwell on things of the past; sentimental
objective
uninfluenced by emotions or personal prejudices; presented factually
ominous
indicating or threatening evil or danger as dark clouds indicate that a storm is coming
parody
a satirical imitation of something serious, such as a comic takeoff of Romeo and Juliet (the parody must have enough elements of the origional for it to be reconized)
persuasive
able to get a person to do something or to agree with one by an appeal to reason or other convincing devices
philosophical
interested in the study of basic truths of existence and reality
pious
having or displaying a reverence for God and religion; sometimes used pejoratively, when the display is excessive and overly righteous
poetical
having the qualities of poetry, such as pleasing rhythms or images
pompous
displaying one's importance in an exaggerated way; sometimes this quality is found in comic characters
prurient
preoccupied with lewd and lustful thoughts
psychological
having to do with the human mind and human behavior
puritanical
strict or severe in matters of morality
realistic
inclined to represent things as they really are
rythmic
characterized by certain patterns, beats, or accents (as in dancing, music, poetry)
romantic
having feelings or thoughts of love, but when assosiated with nineteenth century literature or an such literature is suggests a style that emphasizes freedom of form, imagination, and emotion
sardonic
scornfully or cynically mocking; sarcastic
satirical
using sarcasm and irony, often humorously to expose human folly
sensuous
taking pleasure in things that appeal to the sences; sensual suggests a strong preoccupation with things, such as sexual pleasures
stark
plain, harsh, completely (as in "stark raving mad"); simple or bare, when applied to style, sometimes even bleak or grim
subjective
relying on one's own inner impressions, as opposed to being objective
surrealistic
stressing imagery and the subconscious and sometimes distorting ordinary ideas in order to arrive at artistic truths
terse
effectively concise, brief
trite
lacking power to evoke intrest through overuse or repitition; hackeneyed
urbane
sophisticated, socially polished
victorian
prudish, stuffy, and puritanical (qualities assosiated with Queen Victoria's reign)
whimsical
inclined to be playful, humorous or fanciful
wordy
using more words that necessary to say what you have to say
abstract
theoretical without reference to specifics
absurd
contrary to logic, but sometimes artistically viable
affected
assuming a false manner or attitude to impress others
ambiguous
having two or more possible meanings
analytical
inclined to examine things by studying their contents or parts
anecdotal
involving short narratives of interesting events
angry
resentful, enraged
austere
stern, strict, frugal, unadorned
banal
pointless and uninteresting
baroque
elaborate, ornimental, grotesque
archaic
in the style of an earlier period
bizarre
unusually strange or odd
bland
undisturbing, unemotional, uninteresting
bombastic
pretentious and pompous
breezy
quick-paced, but sometimes superficial
childish
immature (when applied to adults or writing)
cinematic
having the qualities of a motion picture
classical
formal, enduring, and standard, adhering to certain traditional methods
colloquial
characteristic or ordinary and informal conversation
comic
humourous, light, funny (there are many levels)
concise
using very few words to express a great deal
confessional
characterized by personal admissions of faults
contemptious
expressing contempt or distain
convincing
persuasive, believeable, pausible
convoluted
very complicated or involved (as in the case of sentances with many qualifiers, phrases, and clauses)
crepuscular
having to do with twighlight or shadowy areas (as in the darker and more hidden parts of human experience)
cynical
a tendency to believe that all human behavior is selfish and opportunistic
decadent
marked by a decay in morals, values, and artistic standards
depressing
sad, glooomy (without any of the redeeming qualities of true tragedy)
detached
disinterested, unbiased, emotionally disconnected
discursive
moving pointlessly from one subject to another; rambling
dreamlike
having the characteristics of a dream
allusive
containing or characterized by indirect refrences
vexed
distressed, annoyed, perplexed
restrained
held-back, deprived, checked
audacious
fearlessly, often recklessly daring; unrestrained by convention or propriety; insolent; origional
giddy
frivolous and lighthearted; flightly
prococative
tending to provoke or stimulate
sentimental
resulting from or colored by emotion rather than reason or realism
condecending
to deal with people in a patronizing superior manner
contemptuous
manifesting or feeling contempt
zealous
filled with or motivated by zeal; fervant
candid
characterized by openness and sincerity of expression; unreservedly straightforward; impartial
didatic
inclined to teach or moralize excessively
satiric
characterized by satire
whimisical
erratic in behavior or degree of unpredictibility
mock-heroic
a satirical imitation or burlesque of the heroic manner or style
diffident
reserved in manner; timid
petty
lesser, minor
lugubrious
mournful, dismial, gloomy, expecially to an exaggerated or ludicrous degree
bantering
good humored, playful conversation
flippant
marked by diisrespectful levity or casualness; pert
patronizing
to treat in a condecending manner
obscure
not clearly understood or expressed; ambiguous or vague
provincial
limited in perspective; narrow and self centered
homespun
simple and homely; unpretentious
picturesque
strickingly expressive or vivid
cultured
a high degree of taste and refinment formed by aesthetic nad intellectual training
idiomatic
peculiar to or characteriistic of a given language
slang
language particular to a group, jargon or argot
moralistic
marked by a narrow minded morality
insolent
presumptious and insulting in manner or speech, arrogant, disrespectful, rude, impertinent
contentious
ioinvolving or likely to cause contention, contriversal
turgid
excessively ornate or complex in style or language; grandiloquent

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