cueFlash

Glossary of Tooth and Nail

Start Studying! Add Cards ↓

accost
to approach and speak to, often in an aggressive manner.
abject
miserable, wretched
abstemious
eating and drinking sparingly or in moderation, temperate.
acquiesce
to give in or agree without protest or complaint but also without interest or excitement.
abstruse
very hard to understand,
acquisition
1. something acquired or owned.
2. the act of acquiring or owning things.
acquisitive
eager to acquire or own things.
acute
sharp, intense
acrid
harsh, burning, or biting to the taste or smell.
adage
an old saying, a maxim, or proverb.
adamant
stubborn, unyielding, inflexible.
adept
very skillful, expert.
adjunct
something separate and less important that is added to a main thing.
admonish
to warn, caution, scold, or criticize gently, esp. aginst doing something wrong or bad.
admonition
a mild criticism or reprimand, a gentle warning.
adroit
skillful or clever at doing a difficult thing.
adversary
a person one fights against, enemy, opponent.
advocate
a person who speaks or writes in support of another person or of a cause or issue; defender, champion.
aesthetic
of or pert. to beauty, showing appreciation of or sensitivity to beauty in art or nature, tasteful, artistic.
abate
to reduce or become less in value, amount ,or intensity.
affable
easy to talk to, pleasant, kindly, courteous, gracious
affinity
a natural attraction, close relationship, or intense liking.
affront
intentional offense or insult
alacrity
eager willingness and promptness, speed, quickness.
alchemical
pert. to an early form of chemistry primarily concerned with changing common metals into gold and concocting a potion that would ensure eternal youth; hence, possessing a seemingly magical power to change something or someone's form or appearance.
alienate
to make unfriendly or hostile, lose the support of.
altercation
an angry, loud dispute
altruistic
unselfishly concerned with or interested in the welfare of others.
amalgam
a mixture or combination.
ambivalent
simultaneously having opposite or conflicting feelings, such as love and hate, toward a person or thing.
amenable
willing to yield or cooperate, responsive to advice or authority, agreeable.
amiable
friendly, good-natured, agreeable
animosity
hatred, bitterness, extreme dislike
antediluvian
before the biblical flood.
anthology
a collection of selected writings.
antiquated
old-fashioned, outmoded, out-of-date
apathetic
lacking interest or concern, unresponsive.
apocryphal
probably not true, genuine, or authentic; spec., of questionable authorship.
appalling
causing dismay or amazement, frightful
appraise
to officially decide the worth or price of, evaluate, estimate, judge
apprehend
1. to become aware of through the senses; to understand, grasp mentally
2. to arrest (a suspected criminal).
apprehension
1. fear or worry of what may happen, dread.
2. the ability to understand a mental grasp.
apprehensive
fearful, anxious about something in the future.
apprise
to inform, notify
apt
1. having a natural tendency, likely.
2. to the point, suitable.
arbitrary
based only on one's own will or feelings, not based on reason or law.
arcane
understood or known only by a few, mysterious.
archaic
of an earlier period, of a time long past, old-fashioned, no longer in ordinary use.
artisan
a worker trained or skilled in some trade, craftsperson.
ascertain
to find out, make certain of.
ascetic
holding back from pleasures or comforts, self-denying.
assailant
an attacker
assent
agreement, acceptance, consent.
assert
to state confidently or declare firmly.
assess
to determine the value, importance, or extent of; to evaluate, estimate, weigh.
asset
a valuable thing, quality, or resource.
assiduous
showing careful, constant attention.
assuage
1. to make less severe or intense, mitigate, pacify.
2. to satisfy.
attest
to state that something is true, correct, or genuine, give evidence of, confirm.
auspicious
showing signs of future success, indicating a happy or fortunate outcome, favorable.
austere
1. stern or severe in appearance, grim.
2. severely simple, without luxury.
authenticate
to establish the truth of or show to be genuine.
authenticity
the condition or quality of being genuine or true.
authoritative
commanding, giving orders, showing authority.
avaricious
greedy for wealth or possessions, miserly.
banter
good-humored, playful teasing, or joking conversation.
barbarity
cruelty, brutality, savagery.
beguiling
charming, amusing, delightful.
belittle
to make something or someone seem small or unimportant.
belligerent
ready and eager to fight, quarrel, or make war.
beneficence
the doing of good; generosity or kindness.
beneficiary
a person who receives a benefit, spec. an inheritance, bequest or legacy.
benevolence
an inclination to do good; kindliness
benighted
in a state of mental or moral ignorance.
benign
kind, good-natured, arising from or indicative of goodness or happiness, not malevolent or malicious.
bequest
money or property given or left to someone by means of a will.
bestial
having the qualities of a beast, cruel, brutish.
bibliophile
a lover of books, a book collector.
blithe
carefree, showing no concern, thoughtless.
bombastic
using or pert. to speech or writing that sounds grand or impressive but has little meaning or substance.
bondage
slavery, servitude, subjection, serfdom.
boor
a crude, insensitive person.
breadth
width, the measure of something from side to side.
burgeoning
growing or developing quickly.
callous
unfeeling, insensitive, hardhearted.
candid
open and direct, frank, straightforward.
cantankerous
quick to dispute or quarrel, argumentative.
capacious
able to contain a large quantity, roomy, large.
capitulate
to yield, surrender, esp. under specifically negotiated terms.
capricious
unpredictable, changing suddenly for no apparent reason, inconstant.
castigate
to criticize harshly or severely, berate
categorical
absolute, without any question or condition.
celerity
speed, quickness.
charade
an elaborate and obvious show or illusion.
charlatan
a fake, phony, quack, or fraud, esp. one who pretends to have great knowledge or skill.
chasten
to discipline or punish in order to correct or improve.
chastise
to criticize or scold harshly.
chimerical
imaginary, unrealistic, wildly improbable
chronicler
a person who records events in order of time.
circumlocution
a roundabout or wordy way of expressing an idea.
circumspect
cautious, careful, considering all conditions before acting.
circumvent
to go around, bypass, get around by clever maneuvering.
clamor
a loud and continuous noise, strong and noisy protest or outcry, hubbub, uproar.
collaboration
a working with another or others, as on a literary or scientific project.
colloquium
a meeting for discussion, esp. an academic seminar to exchange views on a particular subject.
collusion
a secret agreement or cooperation between persons for an illegal or wrongful purpose.
collosal
very great in size, gigantic, enormous.
commonplace
ordinary, dull, unremarkable
communal
of or relating to a community; public.
concede
to acknowledge as being true, reasonable, or proper.
concoct
to make up, invent, cook up.
concomitant
existing with something else, accompanying.
concordance
an alphabetical index of the important words in a written work (or works of an author) indicating the passages in which they occur.
concur
to agree.
condescension
a proud, snobbish attitude toward anyone considered inferior.
confidant
a person to whom one entrusts personal matters or secrets.
conflagration
a great, destructive fire.
conjecture
an opinion or conclusion based on insufficient evidence, a guess.
conscientious
1. guided by conscience
2. showing thought and care.
conspiracy
a secret plot to commit an evil or illegal act.
constraint
a restriction or limitation.
contemplative
thoughtful, devoted to meditation.
contemporary
a person living at the same time as another.
contemptuous
full of contempt, thinking or treating as inferior or worthless.
contention
a claim that someone supports and argues for.
conviction
a strong belief or opinion.
convivial
1. festive
2. fond of good company, esp. when eating and drinking, sociable
corroborate
to support with more evidence, make more certain or believable, provide further proof.
coup
a brilliant move or action, clever maneuver.
coveted
possessing so much value as to inspire greed or envy
covetous
having a strong desire for something that belongs to someone else.
credence
belief or confidence in the truth of something.
cryptic
mysterious, baffling, having a hidden meaning.
cupidity
greed
cursory
done quickly with little attention to detail
cynical
expressing disbelief in or distrust of others out of a sense that everyone's motives and actions are selfish.
dearth
scarcity, scant supply, lack.
debase
to make lower in value, quality, character, or dignity.
debilitate
to make weak, enfeeble.
decadent
in a state of decline (as in art, literature, morals, etc.), self-indulgent or self-gratifying
decorum
formal, proper, or suitable behavior, dress, speech, etc.; conduct suitable to a situation.
deflate
to reduce the confidence or lessen the importance of
deft
skillful in a quick, smooth way.
deluge
a great flood or downpour.
denigrate
to defame, damage the reputation of
deplorable
1. very bad or unfortunate, regrettable
2. deserving strong disappoval or condemnation.
depraved
wicked, immoral, evil
derision
scornful or sneering laughter, taunting, mockery
desultory
moving or passing from one thing to another, not proceeding in an orderly or organized way, aimless, disconnected.
deteriorate
to grow worse, fall into disrepair, become lower in quality or value.
deviant
not normal, standard, acceptable; abnormal.
devil's advocate
a person who upholds an unpopular case or defends a questionable position for the sake of argument or out of sheer perversity.
devious
not honest and straightforward, sly, shifty, tricky
diagnosis
a careful examination of the facts or nature of something as a decision based on such an examination esp. one by a physician.
diction
manner of expression, choice and arrangement of words.
didactic
designed to instruct or guide behavior
diligence
steady and careful attention, esp. to work or duties.
din
a continuous, loud, annoying noise; uproar.
dire
causing great fear or distress, disastrous, terrible
disaffected
discontented, rebellious.
discern
to detect with the eyes or other senses, recognize mentally.
discerning
having or showing sharp perception and judgment, rapidly noticing small differences or fine distinctions
disclose
uncover, expose to view, reveal
disconcerting
upsetting, frustrating, or embarassing.
discordant
disagreeing, conflicting, clashing, not in harmony.
discourse
to talk, carry on a conversation
discreet
cautious in one's speech or actions, tactful
discretion
the exercise of caution or good judgment.
disdain
scorn, a feeling or show of dislike or disregard for something or someone considered inferior
disgruntled
dissatisfied, resentful, discontented.
disorient
to disturb someone's sense of time, place, or identity.
disparage
to speak of, treat, or regard as inferior or unimportant.
dispense
1. to deal out in portions, distribute, administer.
2. to get rid of, do away with, do without.
disposition
arrangement, makeup, composition.
disseminate
to scatter widely, spread abroad.
dissertation
a lengthy, formal piece of writing, spec. a thesis prepared for a doctoral degree.
dissonant
harsh and disagreeable in sound, jarring to the ear.
divergent
branching off, departing from a set course or opinion, deviating.
divulge
to make known, reveal (usu. something private or secret)
dogged
refusing to give up despite difficulties.
dogmatic
stating opinions in an overbearing manner, opinionated, dictatorial.
dotard
a feeble old person
dour
gloomy, severe, stern
drastic
extreme, severe, harsh, having a strong effect.
droll
amusingly strange, humorously odd.
dupe
someone easily fooled, tricked, or cheated.
duplicity
dishonesty, double-dealing, acting contrary to one's real feelings and beliefs in order to fool or cheat.
dwindle
to decrease steadily, shrink, diminish.
ebullient
overflowing with high spirits, enthusiasm, or excitement
eclectic
selecting, or consisting of selections, from a variety of sources, esp. the best of those sources; varied.
eclipse
to darken, diminish the brightness or importance of, overshadow, surpass, outshine.
edification
moral, spiritual, or intellectual improvement or instruction
edifying
morally, spiritually, or intellectually instructive.
egalitarian
promoting equal treatment for people, esp. as to social, political, and economic rights.
egregious
very bad or offensive in an obvious way, flagrant.
elated
full of joy or happiness, blissful
elicit
to bring out, draw forth.
elitism
a preference for rule or leadership by the elite class.
eloquent
expressed in a strong, clear, graceful, and persuasive way; moving, forceful.
elucidate
to make clear, explain
elude
to escape, avoid
elusive
1. hard to get hold of or capture.
2. hard to define, describe, understand, or remember.
embellish
to make beautiful by adding decoration
eminence
great distinction, superiority, or importance.
empathy
an identification with and ability to share another person's feelings or situation.
emphatic
expressed or done with emphasis, forceful.
emulate
to try to do as well as or better than, esp. by imitating; compete with, rival.
enamored
filled with love or desire, charmed
enervated
weakened, drained of stength or energy
enigma
a riddle, mystery, puzzle; a person, situation, statement, or text that causes confusion, doubt, or bewilderment
ensconced
settled securely or snuggly.
ensue
to follow as a consequence or result, occur next.
entail
to require as a necessary consequence, necessitate.
entity
something that exists and can be recognized as a particular and distinct unit.
enumerate
to list one after the other, count off, name individually
epic
pert. to or having the qualities of a long poem, novel, or play usu. written in a dignified or elevated style, celebrating heroes and heroic deeds.
equanimity
the quality or state of being calm, composed, and even-tempered
equivocate
to intentionally mislead or confuse by using language that can be understood in two or more ways.
erratic
1. not regular or consistent (as in quality or progress).
2. odd or peculiar.
erudite
having or exhibiting deep and extensive learning
esoteric
intended for or understood only by a select group.
estimable
deserving esteem
evanescent
vanishing, short-lived, fleeting
evasive
meaning to evade, not forthright; indirect, intentionally vague or misleading
evocative
having the power to call forth certain ideas or memories.
exasperate
to irritate extremly, to try the patience of.
exlusive
admitting only certain people as friends or members
exegesis
detailed explanation or analysis, esp. of a text.
exemplary
worthy to serve as a model
exert
to put forth or bring to bear
exonerate
to declare blameless, find innocent
exorbitant
far beyond what is usual or proper; excessive
expedient
a means to an end
exploit
a daring deed, heroic feat.
expound
to explain by giving detail
exquisite
of extreme beauty and excellence
extant
still existing
exultant
filled with great joy, expressing triumph
exultation
great rejoicing and jubilation, the state of being exultant
facade
an artificial or deceptive appearance
faculty
a power or capability of the mind or body, either natural or acquired.
far-fetched
not likely to be true or to happen
fatuous
silly or stupid in a complacent way.
feisty
full of spirit or nerve
felicitous
well suited or appropriate
fervid
glowing with feeling, fiery
fetid
having an offensive smell (as of decay), stinking.
fiasco
a total and ignominious failure.
fickle
not loyal or constant (as in affections), given to casual change.

Add Cards

You must Login or Register to add cards